Office of Emergency Management Logo
save_lives.jpg

***THIS PAGE WAS LAST UPDATED ON April 3, 2020***

* Mayor Craig A. Moe has signed Executive Order No. 2020-02 - Declaration of Public Health Emergency COVID-19. Click Here to View.

* Mayor Craig A. Moe has signed Executive Order No. 2020-03 - City of Laurel Operations During a Public Health Emergency COVID-19. Click Here to View.

* Mayor Craig A. Moe has signed Executive Order No. 2020-04 - City of Laurel Operations During a Public Health Emergency COVID-19. Click Here to View.

* Mayor Craig A. Moe has signed Executive Order No. 2020-05 - City of Laurel Operations During a Public Health Emergency COVID-19. Click Here to View.

* Mayor Craig A. Moe has signed Executive Order No. 2020-06 - City of Laurel Operations During a Public Health Emergency COVID-19. Click Here to View.

* Mayor Craig A. Moe has signed Executive Order No. 2020-07 - City of Laurel Operations During a Public Health Emergency COVID-19. Click Here to View.

* Mayor Craig A. Moe has signed Executive Order No. 2020-08 - City of Laurel Operations During a Public Health Emergency COVID-19. Click Here to View.

* Mayor Craig A. Moe has signed Executive Order No. 2020-09 - City of Laurel Operations During a Public Health Emergency COVID-19. Click Here to View.

(NEW) * Mayor Craig A. Moe has signed Executive Order No. 2020-10 - City of Laurel Operations During a Public Health Emergency COVID-19. Click Here to View.

Situation in Maryland

Number of positive COVID-19 tests: 2.758; Number of Deaths: 42

Number of negative test results: 20,932
Hospitalizations: 664 ever hospitalized
Released from Isolation: 159

Cases by Age Range:

0-9: 9

10-19: 55

20-29 : 335

30-39: 485

40-49: 509

50-59: 552

60-69: 423

70-79: 266

80+ : 124

 

md_map_covid_4_3_20.jpg
md_map_covid_4_2_20.jpg

 

This is a rapidly evolving situation. For accurate, up-to-date information on COVID-19, the Office of Emergency Managment recommends you​ click here.

     

    COVID-19 Now a Pandemic

     

    A pandemic is a global outbreak of disease. Pandemics happen when a new virus emerges to infect people and can spread between people sustainably. Because there is little to no pre-existing immunity against the new virus, it spreads worldwide.

    The virus that causes COVID-19 is infecting people and spreading easily from person-to-person. Cases have been detected in most countries worldwide and community spread is being detected in a growing number of countries. On March 11, the COVID-19 outbreak was characterized as a pandemic by the World Health Organization (WHO)external icon.

    This is the first pandemic known to be caused by the emergence of a new coronavirus. In the past century, there have been four pandemics caused by the emergence of novel influenza viruses. As a result, most research and guidance around pandemics is specific to influenza, but the same premises can be applied to the current COVID-19 pandemic. Pandemics of respiratory disease follow a certain progression outlined in a “Pandemic Intervals Framework.” Pandemics begin with an investigation phase, followed by recognition, initiation, and acceleration phases. The peak of illnesses occurs at the end of the acceleration phase, which is followed by a deceleration phase, during which there is a decrease in illnesses. Different countries can be in different phases of the pandemic at any point in time and different parts of the same country can also be in different phases of a pandemic.

    There are ongoing investigations to learn more. This is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it becomes available.

     

      Situation throughout the United States

      COVID-19 Cases in the United States Reported to CDC:

      • Total Cases: 213,144
      • Deaths: 4,513
      • States Reporting Cases: 55 (50 states, District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam,the Northern Marianas Islands and US Virgin Islands
      • Travel-related: 1,144
      • Close contact: 3,245
      • Under investigation: 209,755

      How It Spreads

      Person-to-person spread

      The virus is thought to spread mainly from person-to-person.

      • Between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet).
      • Through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes.

      These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs.

      Can someone spread the virus without being sick?

      • People are thought to be most contagious when they are most symptomatic (the sickest).
      • Some spread might be possible before people show symptoms; there have been reports of this occurring with this new coronavirus, but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.

      Spread from contact with contaminated surfaces or objects

      It may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes, but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.

      How easily the virus spreads

      How easily a virus spreads from person-to-person can vary. Some viruses are highly contagious (spread easily), like measles, while other viruses do not spread as easily. Another factor is whether the spread is sustained, spreading continually without stopping.

      The virus that causes COVID-19 seems to be spreading easily and sustainably in the community (“community spread”) in some affected geographic areas.

      Community spread means people have been infected with the virus in an area, including some who are not sure how or where they became infected.

      Symptoms

      Reported illnesses have ranged from mild symptoms to severe illness and death for confirmed coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases.

      These symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure (based on the incubation period of MERS-CoV viruses).

      • Fever
      • Cough
      • Shortness of breath

      Person perspiring and thermometer indicating person has a fever

       

      person holding a cloth and coughing into the cloth

       

      image depicting lungs with restricted air representing shortness of breath

       

      If you develop emergency warning signs for COVID-19 get medical attention immediately. Emergency warning signs include*:

      • Trouble breathing
      • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
      • New confusion or inability to arouse
      • Bluish lips or face

      *This list is not all inclusive. Please consult your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning.

       

      Prevention and Treatment

      To read more information on prevention and treatment, please refer to the Prince George's County Public Health Departmet at https://www.princegeorgescountymd.gov/3397/Coronavirus or the Maryland Department of Health at https://coronavirus.maryland.gov/ .

       

      City of Laurel Officials will continue to monitor local, state and federal health agencies, so we can bring you the most accurate information in a timely fashion. In the meantime, please be sure to visit CDC's website at www.CDC.gov or the Maryland Department of Health's website at www.health.maryland.gov, for up to date information. And most of all, stay calm and as a community we will work together to help stop the spread of COVID-19.

      __________________________________________________

      EN ESPANOL:

      Office of Emergency Management Logo
      save_lives.jpg

       

      *** ESTA PÁGINA FUE ACTUALIZADA POR ÚLTIMA EL 3 DE ABRIL​ DE 2020 ***

       

      * El alcalde Craig A. Moe ha firmado la Orden Ejecutiva No. 2020-02 - Declaración de Emergencia de Salud Pública COVID-19. Haz clic aquí para ver.

      * El alcalde Craig A. Moe ha firmado la Orden ejecutiva No. 2020-03 - Operaciones de la ciudad de Laurel durante una emergencia de salud pública COVID-19. Haz clic aquí para ver.

      * El alcalde Craig A. Moe ha firmado la Orden ejecutiva No. 2020-04 - Operaciones de la ciudad de Laurel durante una emergencia de salud pública COVID-19. Haz clic aquí para ver.
      * El alcalde Craig A. Moe ha firmado la Orden ejecutiva No. 2020-05 - Operaciones de la ciudad de Laurel durante una emergencia de salud pública COVID-19. Haz clic aquí para ver.
      * El alcalde Craig A. Moe ha firmado la Orden ejecutiva No. 2020-06 - Operaciones de la ciudad de Laurel durante una emergencia de salud pública COVID-19. Haz clic aquí para ver.​

      * El alcalde Craig A. Moe ha firmado la Orden ejecutiva No. 2020-07 - Operaciones de la ciudad de Laurel durante una emergencia de salud pública COVID-19. Haz clic aquí para ver.
      * El alcalde Craig A. Moe ha firmado la Orden ejecutiva No. 2020-08 - Operaciones de la ciudad de Laurel durante una emergencia de salud pública COVID-19. Haz clic aquí para ver.
      * El alcalde Craig A. Moe ha firmado la Orden ejecutiva No. 2020-09 - Operaciones de la ciudad de Laurel durante una emergencia de salud pública COVID-19. Haz clic aquí para ver.​

      (NUEVO) * El alcalde Craig A. Moe ha firmado la Orden Ejecutiva No. 2020-10 - Operaciones de la Ciudad de Laurel durante una emergencia de salud pública COVID-19. Haga clic aquí para ver.

      Situación en Maryland

      Número de pruebas positivas de COVID-19: 2,758; Número de muertes: 42

      Número de resultados negativos de la prueba: 20,932

      Hospitalizaciones: 664 hospitalizadas alguna vez

      Liberado del aislamiento: 159

      Casos por rango de edad:

      0-9: 9

      10-19: 55

      20-29 : 335

      30-39: 485

      40-49: 509

      50-59: 552

      60-69: 423

      70-79: 266

      80+ : 124

      md_map_covid_4_3_20.jpg

      Para obtener información precisa y actualizada sobre COVID-19, visite:

      CDC - https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html

      Departamento de Salud de Maryland - https://phpa.health.maryland.gov/Pages/Novel-coronavirus.aspx

      Departamento de Salud del Condado de Prince George - https://www.princegeorgescountymd.gov/1588/Health-Services

       

       

      COVID-19 ahora una pandemia Una pandemia es un brote global de enfermedad.

      Las pandemias ocurren cuando surge un nuevo virus que infecta a las personas y puede propagarse entre las personas de manera sostenible. Debido a que existe poca o ninguna inmunidad preexistente contra el nuevo virus, se propaga por todo el mundo. El virus que causa COVID-19 está infectando a las personas y se está propagando fácilmente de persona a persona. Se han detectado casos en la mayoría de los países del mundo y se está detectando la propagación de la comunidad en un número creciente de países. El 11 de marzo, el brote de COVID-19 se caracterizó como una pandemia por el ícono externo de la Organización Mundial de la Salud (OMS). Esta es la primera pandemia causada por la aparición de un nuevo coronavirus. En el siglo pasado, ha habido cuatro pandemias causadas por la aparición de nuevos virus de influenza. Como resultado, la mayoría de las investigaciones y orientaciones sobre pandemias son específicas de la influenza, pero las mismas premisas pueden aplicarse a la pandemia actual de COVID-19. Las pandemias de enfermedades respiratorias siguen una cierta progresión descrita en un "Marco de intervalos de pandemia". Las pandemias comienzan con una fase de investigación, seguida de las fases de reconocimiento, iniciación y aceleración. El pico de enfermedades ocurre al final de la fase de aceleración, que es seguida por una fase de desaceleración, durante la cual hay una disminución de las enfermedades. Diferentes países pueden estar en diferentes fases de la pandemia en cualquier momento y diferentes partes del mismo país también pueden estar en diferentes fases de una pandemia. Hay investigaciones en curso para obtener más información. Esta es una situación en rápida evolución y la información se actualizará a medida que esté disponible.

       

      Situación en todo Estados Unidos.

      Casos de COVID-19 en los Estados Unidos reportados a los CDC:

      • Total de Casos: 213,144
      • Muertes: 4,513
      • Estados que reportan casos: 55 (50 estados, e Distrito de Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, Northern Marianas e Islas Vírgenes de los Estados Unidos)
      • Relacionado con viajes: 1,144
      • Contacto cercano: 3,245
      • Bajo investigación: 209,755

       

      Difusión de persona a persona

      Se cree que el virus se propaga principalmente de persona a persona.

      • Entre personas que están en contacto cercano entre sí (dentro de unos 6 pies).
      • A través de gotas respiratorias producidas cuando una persona infectada tose o estornuda.

      Estas gotitas pueden caer en la boca o la nariz de las personas cercanas o posiblemente ser inhaladas a los pulmones.

      ¿Alguien puede transmitir el virus sin estar enfermo?

      • Se cree que las personas son más contagiosas cuando son más sintomáticas (las más enfermas).
      • Es posible que se propague algo antes de que las personas muestren síntomas; Ha habido informes de que esto ocurre con este nuevo coronavirus, pero no se cree que esta sea la principal forma en que se propaga el virus.

      Propagación del contacto con superficies u objetos contaminados.

      Es posible que una persona pueda contraer COVID-19 al tocar una superficie u objeto que tiene el virus y luego tocarse la boca, la nariz o posiblemente los ojos, pero no se cree que esta sea la forma principal en que el virus se extiende

      Con qué facilidad se propaga el virus

      La facilidad con que un virus se transmite de persona a persona puede variar. Algunos virus son altamente contagiosos (se propagan fácilmente), como el sarampión, mientras que otros virus no se propagan tan fácilmente. Otro factor es si la propagación es sostenida, extendiéndose continuamente sin detenerse.

      El virus que causa COVID-19 parece propagarse de manera fácil y sostenible en la comunidad ("propagación de la comunidad") en algunas áreas geográficas afectadas.

      La propagación comunitaria significa que las personas han sido infectadas con el virus en un área, incluidas algunas que no están seguras de cómo o dónde se infectaron.

       

      Síntomas

      Las enfermedades reportadas han variado desde síntomas leves hasta enfermedades graves y muerte por casos confirmados de enfermedad por coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19).

      Estos síntomas pueden aparecer 2-14 días después de la exposición (según el período de incubación de los virus MERS-CoV).

      • Fiebre
      • Tos
      • Falta de aliento

       

      Person perspiring and thermometer indicating person has a fever

       

      person holding a cloth and coughing into the cloth

       

      image depicting lungs with restricted air representing shortness of breath

       

      Si desarrolla señales de advertencia de emergencia para COVID-19, obtenga atención médica de inmediato. Las señales de advertencia de emergencia incluyen *:

      • Dificultad para respirar
      • Dolor o presión persistentes en el pecho.
      • Nueva confusión o incapacidad para despertar
      • Labios o cara azulados

      *Esta lista no es del todo inclusiva. Consulte a su proveedor médico para cualquier otro síntoma que sea grave o preocupante.

      Prevención y tratamiento

      Para leer más información sobre prevención y tratamiento, consulte el Departamento de Salud Pública del Condado de Prince George en https://www.princegeorgescountymd.gov/3397/Coronavirus o el Departamento de Salud de Maryland en https://coronavirus.maryland.gov/.

       

      Los funcionarios de la Ciudad de Laurel continuarán monitoreando las agencias de salud locales, estatales y federales, para que podamos brindarle la información más precisa de manera oportuna. Mientras tanto, asegúrese de visitar el sitio web de los CDC en www.CDC.gov o el sitio web del Departamento de Salud de Maryland en www.health.maryland.gov, para obtener información actualizada. Y, sobre todo, mantén la calma y, como comunidad, trabajaremos juntos para ayudar a detener la propagación de COVID-19.

      City Seal

      Communications

      The Department of Communications provides useful information of public interest and importance to the community, residents and businesses within the city limits, as well as the greater Laurel area.
      Office of Emergency Management Logo

      Emergency Management

      The Office of Emergency Management plans and prepares for emergencies, educates the public about preparedness, coordinates emergency response and recovery efforts and disseminates information during emergencies and disasters.